December 26, 2014

J. Mark Collins publishes "Adam Worth: A Critical Analysis of the Criminal Motivations Behind the Man Who Stole the Duchess of Devonshire" in the Fall 2014 issue of The Journal of Art Crime

by Catherine Schofield Sezgin,
   ARCA Blog Editor-in-chief

In the Fall 2014 issue of The Journal of Art Crime, J. Mark Collins publishes "Adam Worth: A Critical Analysis of the Criminal Motivations Behind the Man Who Stole the Duchess of Devonshire". This is the abstract:
Adam Worth was a career criminal who lived over one hundred years ago, and is best known for his theft of Gainsborough’s portrait of the Duchess of Devonshire. The context in which Worth plied his trade—the era of technology and change—facilitated much of his success. A critical review of his extensive career, including a number of uniquely famous thefts, will be viewed through the lens of four criminological theories: Strain Theory, Differential Association Theory, Rational Choice Theory, and Routine Activity Theory, to not only explain his motivation and behaviour, but also to explore the causality of criminality in general. This critical analysis supports the contention that no one theory of criminology, no matter how broad, can adequately explain such a complicated individual whose criminal career spanned four decades. Rather, an integrated theory of criminology, one that is both flexible and fluid, is essential in order to explain the life of such a multifaceted and unique individual as Adam Worth.
J. Mark Collins is a Sergeant with the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP), currently assigned as a Senior Investigator with the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario. As a 22-year veteran of the force, Collins has investigated everything from traffic accidents to homicides. His interest in art theft
investigation (something his beautiful wife, Laura, and three wonderful girls, Brianna, Aliyah and Aislyn, would say borders on an obsession), has developed over many years. As a youth he was the caretaker of the expansive fine arts collection housed in his employer’s country estate, a collection
that now resides in the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Royal Ontario Museum. Prior to joining the OPP, Collins worked at the Art Gallery of Ontario and kept a close eye on the pieces donated by his old boss. His goal is to start a proper art theft unit within the OPP, but until such time, he spends his spare time teaching Karate, writing, building furniture and trying to keep up with his girls.

Subscriptions to The Journal of Art Crime or individual copies of eEditions or printed issues may be obtained through ARCA's website here.

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