Showing posts with label ARCAblog. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ARCAblog. Show all posts

August 7, 2020

Friday, August 07, 2020 - , No comments

A thanks to our readership on Twitter and Facebook

Five days ago, ARCA's art crime and cultural heritage protection blog began experiencing problems on the Facebook Platform posting to a few key heritage groups where our blog posts were sometimes being censored as spam.  While it took us a while to realize that this was not a technical glitch on the platform itself, by Thursday our blog's URL was totally banned, even from our own Facebook page despite us not having violated the site's Terms of Service.  

This total ban eliminated years of previous post links and information related to the issues surrounding art crimes that we have covered and published on the platform in an effort to increase awareness and build capacity on combatting art and heritage crime. 

Finding it difficult to find a way to engage directly with any sort of "help" department within the social media powerhouse's platform, we sent inquiries through about twenty different channels, each of which gave bot replies thanking us for our concerns but in no way indicating that our messages would be read by a human.   We also reached out to our readership asking our followers to help us get the lights turned back on by echoing our concerns with retweets and by contacting Facebook directly on our behalf.   Hoping that perhaps with external voices of support they would realize we were ok. 

This morning at 09:45 Italy time our access was restored.

In the end, we have no idea what changed Facebook's mind.  We have never received any communication from the social media platform as to why we were censored in the first place, nor did anyone contact us to tell us that our access had been restored but for now it seems we have been white-listed. 

We would like to thank everyone who helped our voice be heard and who banged the drums loud enough that we regained our posting capabilities on the platform. ARCA has been writing articles on art crime and cultural heritage protection for more than 10 years and while we still do not fully understand why we were suddenly censured on Facebook, it seems that everyone's notifications helped get the situation reversed relatively quickly. 

Without your group voice, ARCA's art crime blog would likely still be banned. 

September 18, 2017

Monday, September 18, 2017 - , No comments

What's the difference between ARCA's Blog and the Association's Journal of Art Crime?

  • The Journal of Art Crime articles are PDF, while ARCAblog posts are HTML, often with hyperlinks. 
  • The Journal of Art Crime articles usually have a title, abstract, introduction, methods, results (or description), discussion/conclusions, and references. 
  • ARCAblog posts are often simple discussion and conclusions and are frequently short-form. Blogposts are also designed to draw readers attention to current happenings in the field. 
  • ARCAblog posts might take an hour or two to write, whereas a Journal of Art Crime article might take weeks, months, or, if its a significant body of research, a year or more.
  • ARCA Blog posts allow and invite reader comments. JAC papers are commented on via academic citation in other academic papers. 
  • The Journal of Art Crime articles are immutable once published, whereas ARCAblog posts can be updated after initial publication if new information is obtained.
  • The Journal of Art Crime articles are archived by the publisher, whereas ARCAblog posts are hosted on Blogger which may be more ephemeral as blog posts are impermanent and can be deleted. 
  • The Journal of Art Crime is peer-reviewed, whereas ARCAblog posts are not.
Lastly the ARCABlog has been designed to be Open Access (OA) meaning ARCA gives readers free unrestricted online access to what it posts.  ARCA's Journal of Art Crime is available by subscription for both digitial and print versions, as the act of publishing research has an intrinsic cost.  Through subscription fees JAC subscribers help facilitate and promote global communication of academic research and discourse in the field of art crime.


Want to know more about the Journal of Art Crime? 

The Journal of Art Crime has been published in print and digital format by the Association for Research into Crimes against Art since Spring 2009.   Published twice per year during the Autumn and Spring,  the JAC is edited by Noah Charney, Marc Balcells and Christos Tsirogiannis. Each issue contains a select mixture of peer-reviewed academic articles, regular columns, editorials, and book reviews from contributors actively involved within the art crime and heritage protection sectors.  

More formal than the ARCAblog, the Journal of Art Crime seeks to identify emerging and under-examined trends related to art crime and to develop strategies that advocate for the responsible stewardship of our collective artistic and archaeological heritage.

Interested in Subscribing?  

If you are interested in a personal or institutional subscription to the Journal of Art Crime please click on the sidebar "Contact Us" link and the ARCAblog editors will forward your request to our counterparts so that they can email you the costs in your area for institutional or personal print and eSubscriptions. 

Interested in Becoming a Journal of Art Crime Contributor?

The Editorial Board of the Journal of Art Crime welcomes the submission of well researched articles for consideration.  All submissions are expected to be appropriately annotated and referenced and should be submitted free from errors.   JAC submission guidelines can be found here along with a listing of the Table of Contents and article titles for past issues.

General questions and inquiries about the Journal of Art Crime should be addressed to the JAC's editors.

September 18, 2015

Friday, September 18, 2015 - , No comments

What's the Difference between the ARCA Blog and The Journal of Art Crime?

  • Journal of Art Crime articles are PDF, while ARCAblog posts are HTML. 
  • Journal of Art Crime articles usually have a title, abstract, introduction, methods, results (or description), discussion/conclusions, and references. ARCAblog posts are often simple discussion and conclusions with hyperlinks and are frequently short-form. Blogposts are also designed to draw readers attention to current happenings in the field. 
  • ARCAblog posts might take an hour or two to write, whereas a Journal of Art Crime article might take weeks, months, or, if its a significant body of research, years. 
  • ARCA Blog posts allow and invite reader comments. JAC papers are commented on via academic citation in other academic papers. 
  • Journal of Art Crime articles are immutable once published, whereas ARCAblog posts can, and often are updated after initial publication.
  • Journal of Art Crime articles are archived by the publisher, whereas ARCAblog posts are hosted on Blogger which may be more ephemeral as blog posts are impermanent and can be deleted. 
  • Journal of Art Crime articles are peer-reviewed, whereas ARCAblog posts are not.

Lastly the ARCABlog has been designed to be Open Access (OA) meaning ARCA gives readers free unrestricted online access to what it posts.  ARCA's Journal of Art Crime is available by subscription, as the act of publishing research has an intrinsic cost.  Through subscription fees JAC subscribers help facilitate and promote global communication of academic research and discourse in the field of art crime. 

Want to know more about the Journal of Art Crime? 

The Journal of Art Crime has been published in print and digital format by the Association for Research into Crimes against Art since Spring 2009.   Published twice per year during the Autumn and Spring,  the JAC is edited by Noah Charney, Marc Balcells and Christos Tsirogiannis. Each issue contains a select mixture of peer-reviewed academic articles, regular columns, editorials, and book reviews from contributors actively involved within the art crime and heritage protection sectors.  

More formal than the ARCAblog, the Journal of Art Crime seeks to identify emerging and under-examined trends related to art crime and to develop strategies that advocate for the responsible stewardship of our collective artistic and archaeological heritage.

Interested in Subscribing?  

If you are interested in a personal or institutional subscription to the Journal of Art Crime please click on the sidebar "Contact Us" link and the ARCAblog editors will forward your request to our counterparts so that they can email you the costs in your area for institutional or personal print and eSubscriptions. 

Interested in Becoming a Journal of Art Crime Contributor?

The Editorial Board of the Journal of Art Crime welcomes the submission of well researched articles for consideration.  All submissions are expected to be appropriately annotated and referenced and should be submitted free from errors.   JAC submission guidelines can be found here along with a listing of the Table of Contents and article titles for past issues. 

General questions and inquiries about the Journal of Art Crime should be addressed to the JAC's editors. 



February 2, 2011

Noah Charney interviews Mark Durney, creator of the ARCAblog and "Art Theft Central" in his new ARTINFO column "The Secret History of Art"

In his new ARTINFO column, "The Secret History of Art," Noah Charney interviews Mark Durney who discusses how he began studying art crime and his development of the ARCA blog. You can read it here.

Durney studied History at Trinity College in Hartford, CT and earned a masters degree in cultural heritage studies at University College London's Institute of Archaeology.

Here's an excerpt from Charney's interview:
Describe some of your past work experience?

While a student at Trinity College, I pursued internships in finance, including in the financial services strategic business unit of Capgemini Consulting. Although not related to the culture heritage field, these experiences greatly enhanced my research and analytical skills as well as my business acumen. Since graduation in 2008, I have volunteered and consulted with ARCA on a number of projects, such as the development of ARCA's blog and podcasts, and the advancement of its postgraduate program International Art Crime and Cultural Heritage Protection Studies. Additionally, in 2009 I worked as a gallery officer at Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, which was the victim of an art heist in March 1990. During my studies at UCL, I completed a work placement in the UK's Museums, Libraries, and Archives Council's Cultural Property Unit. In my spare time, I maintain Art Theft Central, which discusses art theft news and provides insights into the historical trends in the field, and I moderate the Museum Security Network, which redistributes news related to the protection, preservation, and conservation of cultural heritage. 

How did you develop an interest in art crime and cultural heritage?
At Trinity College, I wrote my senior thesis on debunking the Thomas Crown Affair art heist scenario by utilizing a number of case studies from the 20th century. This was not hard to do in light of the fact that not every art thief is as sophisticated or affluent as Thomas Crown! Similarly, my master's thesis "An Examination of Art Theft, Analysis of Relevant Statistics, and Insights into the Protection of Cultural Heritage" qualifies and interprets art theft statistics provided by the London-based Art Loss Register (ALR) and the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) in order to quantify the problem of art theft and to assess the effectiveness of the most recent strategies that have been implemented to combat the illicit art trade. 

How did you learn about ARCA and first become involved? 

I received "The Art Thief" for Christmas 2008, and after reading it began seeking opportunities that enabled me to contribute to the greater security of our collective cultural heritage. Eventually, I discovered ARCA and Noah Charney offered me voluntary (and eventually paid) opportunities.